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Articles for the keywords: UNIX
28 Oct 2013 Java Spotlight Episode 150: James Gosling on Java [33459]
Interview with James Gosling, father of Java and Java Champion

This week's podcast features an interview with James Gosling, father of Java and Java Champion, on the history of Java, his work at Liquid Robotics, NetBeans IDE, the future of Java and what he sees as the next revolutionary trend in the computer industry. James Gosling received a BSc in Computer Science from the University of Calgary, Canada in 1977. He received a PhD in Computer Science from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1983. The title of his thesis was "The Algebraic Manipulation of Constraints". He spent many years as a VP & Fellow at Sun Microsystems. He has built satellite data acquisition systems, a multiprocessor version of Unix, several compilers, mail systems and window managers. He has also built a WYSIWYG text editor, a constraint based drawing editor and a text editor called 'Emacs' for Unix systems.
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27 Oct 2013 Top Ten Articles for last few Issues [33380]
Vol 188 Issues 1, 2 and 3; Vol 187 Issues 1, 2, 3 and 4; Vol 186 Issue 4

We track how frequently each article is viewed on the web site to determine which the readers consider the most important. For last week, the top 10 articles were:

  • The End of the CIO As We Know It -- And IT Feels Fine
  • 9 Forces That Are Changing The Way Businesses Run
  • Where it Makes Sense to Avoid the Cloud
  • Old NFS is the New Darling in Virtualization
  • New NIST Cybersecurity Standards Could Pose Liability Risks
  • Complex Clouds Must be Managed with Automation
  • Flexible Displays: FAQ
  • Three CIOs Who Made Revenue Generation their Business
  • Software Defined Storage and Networking: Will it Work?
  • User-Selected Passwords Still Getting Cracked

The longer version of this article has list of top ten articles for the last 8 weeks.
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21 Oct 2013 Unix: Where Shutdowns are not Disasters [33445]
IT World, October 22nd, 2013

"In the wake of the federal shutdown, I can't help but spend a little time reminiscing about how easily and non-traumatically Unix systems generally shut down ... and reboot. No tens of billions of dollars lost from the economy. No sturm und drang about what gets funded. A planned reboot of a Unix system is often a healthy operation that can help to ensure that your system is running smoothly and that required services are configured properly. After a successful reboot, you can feel more confident that your Unix system can be restarted without unexpected consequences any time you may feel the need..."
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13 Oct 2013 Top Ten Articles for last few Issues [33206]
Vol 188 Issue 1; Vol 187 Issues 1, 2, 3 and 4; Vol 186 Issues 2, 3 and 4

We track how frequently each article is viewed on the web site to determine which the readers consider the most important. For last week, the top 10 articles were:

Top Ten Articles for Vol 187 Issue 4

  • How To Design A Storage Array: NOT LIKE THAT, Buddy
  • Many Security Professionals Don't Understand Modern Malware
  • BYOD: Like Inviting Your Boss into Your House When You're Not Home
  • Look Who's Coming to Town - OpenStorage Summit at the Santa Clara Convention Center
  • 4 Ways CIOs Can to Respond to a Service Outage
  • Unix: When Pipes Get Names
  • Will Technology Put You Out of an IT Job?
  • Replacing Silicon with Nanotubes Could Revolutionize Tech
  • Penetration Testing With Honest-To-Goodness Malware
  • NSA Chief: Don't Dump Essential Security Tools

The longer version of this article has list of top ten articles for the last 8 weeks.
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13 Oct 2012 Unix: When Pipes Get Names [33214]
IT World, September 29th, 2013

"Unix pipes are wonderful because they keep you from having to write intermediate command output to disk (relatively slow) and you don't need to clean up temporary files afterwards," writes sandra Henry-Stocker in "IT World."

"Once you get the knack, you can string commands together and get a lot of work done with a single line of commands. But there are two types of pipes that you can use when working on a Unix system - regular, unnamed or anonymous pipes and named pipes. These two types of pipes share some advantages, but are used and implemented very differently..."
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