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Archived IT - FOSS Articles
04 Sep 2017
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The Sudden Death and Eternal Life of Solaris [66099]
By Bryan Cantrill

Bryan Cantrill blogs, "As had been rumored for a while, Oracle effectively killed Solaris on Friday 'Sept. 1st'. When I first saw this, I had assumed that this was merely a deep cut, but in talking to Solaris engineers still at Oracle, it is clearly much more than that. It is a cut so deep as to be fatal: the core Solaris engineering organization lost on the order of 90% of its people, including essentially all management.

Of note, among the engineers I have spoken with, I heard two things repeatedly: 'this is the end' and (from those who managed to survive Friday) 'I wish I had been laid off.' Gone is any of the optimism (however tepid) that I have heard over the years - and embarrassed apologies for Oracle's behavior have been replaced with dismay about the clumsiness, ineptitude and callousness with which this final cut was handled..."
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31 Aug 2017
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LibreOffice 5.4.1 'Fresh' And Libreoffice 5.3.6 'Still' [65971]
The Document Foundation, August 31st, 2017

The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.4.1, the first minor release of the new LibreOffice 5.4 family, which was announced in early August, and LibreOffice 5.3.6, the sixth release of the mature LibreOffice 5.3 family, which was announced in January 2017.

LibreOffice 5.4.1 represents the bleeding edge in term of features, and as such is targeted at technology enthusiasts and early adopters, while LibreOffice 5.3.6 is targeted at conservative users and enterprise deployments.
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30 Aug 2017
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78 Open Source Replacements For Expensive Applications [65970]
Datamation, August 30th, 2017

"Back when Datamation first started making lists of open source software that could replace expensive proprietary applications, most commercial software came in a box and required a flat fee for purchase. These days, with the advent of cloud computing and software as a service, most applications require a regular monthly or yearly subscription.

Those subscriptions make it seem like software has become more affordable. After all, $10 or $20 a month doesn't seem like a lot. But when you add up those repeating fees, users often pay more under the new subscription plans than they did under the old flat-fee arrangements. If you use a lot of different applications, those fees can quickly add up. And it can be particularly hard to justify the expense for a piece of software that you only use once in a while..."
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23 Aug 2017
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Dice and The Linux Foundation's 2017 Open Source Jobs Report reveals Linux and open-source jobs are hotter than ever. [65804]
ZDNet, August 23rd, 2017

"Dice and The Linux Foundation's 2017 Open Source Jobs Report reveals Linux and open-source jobs are hotter than ever...

So, you want a technology job, do you? Then you should work on your open-source skills because that's where the jobs are. According to Dice, the leading technology job site, and The Linux Foundation, opportunities for open-source professionals are abound, as companies strive to improve efficiency and cut time to market..."
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23 Aug 2017
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Why open source should be the first choice for cloud-native environments [65805]
opensouce.com, August 23rd, 2017

"For the same reasons Linux beat out proprietary software, open source should be the first choice for cloud-native environments...

Let's take a trip back in time to the 1990s, when proprietary software reigned, but open source was starting to come into its own. What caused this switch, and more importantly, what can we learn from it today as we shift into cloud-native environments?..".
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18 Aug 2017
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Non-Linux Foss: File Spelunking With Windirstat [65644]
Linux Journal, August 18th, 2017

"With Linux, it's fairy easy to find the large files on your system by doing something like this:

du -ahx / | sort -rh | head -20

Unfortunately, Windows users don't usually have equivalent tools. That's where something like WinDirStat comes into play. It's a file browser that uses incredible GUI elements to show you the files on your system with file size shown as rectangles. Big files are shown as big rectangles, and their file types are specified by color. It's a great visual way to sort your filesystem and get rid of (or at least find) extremely large files..."
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